Window Styles – Types, Costs & More

Last Updated on October 10, 2021

When choosing a new window for your home, it can be daunting to decide between styles. Not only will you need to consider aesthetics, but your budget will influence the choice too.

The cost of new windows will depend heavily on the style, size, material, and glazing. The most expensive windows tend to be bay and bow windows because they are often larger and more complex – but roof windows will also usually cost more as the installation can be tricky.

This guide will talk you through the different types of window styles and their pros and cons.

Window Styles – An Overview: 

Here is an overview of the most popular window styles currently available, defining exactly what they are, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each outlined.

Bay Windows

What are bay windows?

Bay windows protrude outwards from the property, which allows for more space inside than with other windows that install on a flat wall. They’re usually made up of 3-5 panes and give pretty, panoramic views of the outside. There are three types of bay window:

  • Box – These are straight and flat windows, resembling a box
  • Bow – These are the typical style of bay window, curving outwards with more panes of glass
  • Circle – These are the most rounded type of bay window

Pros and cons of bay windows 

Not only are bay windows one of the most attractive types of window, especially charming on period properties, but they also make the home feel more spacious and allow for great views. They are relatively low maintenance and can add value to your home as they are highly sought after.

However, installation is a lot trickier with bay windows, which can increase the costs when compared to other styles. As well as this, as they have lots of glass, this can mean that during the summer, the room gets too warm. These windows often cost around £1000-£2400, although you will need to consider installation costs on top of this.

Sliding Windows

What are sliding windows? 

Horizontal sliding windows are a practical and stylish choice, especially great over kitchen counters and sinks. They open by sliding sideways along a track, and as they are often made from aluminium, they have a modern look that is great in new builds.

Pros and cons of sliding windows 

These windows are far easier to open than traditional crank-style or casement windows, and don’t encroach on interior space – they’re also relatively cheap, costing anywhere from £150-£700.

On the other hand, because they run on tracks, if dust or debris is allowed to build up, it can damage the window – although, with proper maintenance this should not be an issue.

Casement Windows

What are casement windows?

Casement windows are a popular choice for those living in the UK. They are your typical windows, attached on one side and swinging outwards to open (they can also be attached from the top or bottom, too).

Design-wise, these windows offer flexibility when it comes to materials and sizes, and you can also opt for double or triple glazing.

Pros and cons of casement windows 

These windows are popular for a reason – they have plenty of positives, including:

  • Versatility – They can suit most types of properties using timber, uPVC, or aluminium frames.
  • Great insulation – These windows are fully sealed when shut, which means that your home won’t be losing heat in the winter, increasing the energy efficiency of your home and reducing heating bills.
  • Simplicity – By design, these windows are simple to use and very reliable.
  • Price – Costing between £150-£575, these are some of the cheapest windows on the market.

One drawback of casement windows is they are often not the best option for period properties, where a more traditional bay window may look better. They also open very wide, which can be a safety risk if you have young children or vulnerable people in your home.

Dual Turn Windows

What are dual turn windows 

Similar to sash windows, dual turn windows will tilt as they slide outwards. They are made of two separate sections, each with their own handle which controls the motion.

Pros and cons of dual turn windows 

These windows are great, managing to tread the line between modern and traditional. Both sashes will be able to rotate, which allows for both sides of the window to be cleaned easily, as well being good for ventilation.

Price-wise, these windows can fluctuate in cost anywhere between £500-£2000, depending on the size and materials used. This means that they can be a lot more expensive than other types of windows – but, if your budget allows, they can make a great choice for many homes.

Sash Windows

What are sash windows? 

Sash windows are often found on period properties, specifically Georgian and Edwardian buildings, and they’re opened by sliding the glass pane up or down. They are called sash as they have small panes of glass, separated by a sash-looking glazing bar.

Pros and cons of sash windows

Sash windows have an abundance of positives, aside from their traditional charm and elegance. Some other pros include:

  • They are the top choice for homes in conservation areas, as they are often handcrafted in natural timber
  • Because they don’t have hinges, it means that they are less likely to be slammed shut by the wind, preventing any damage
  • Sash windows are often relatively cheap compared to other types, with basic windows costing between £500-£900

If ventilation is a top priority for your home, these windows may not be the best choice as they offer less ventilation than other styles of window. This is because you will only be able to open the equivalent of one panel, and condensation can sometimes form as a result of this.

Tilt and Turn Windows

What are tilt and turn windows? 

Where casement windows open outwards, tilt and turn windows open inwards from the top – this is not only great for homes with children, but it makes it easier to clean the outside pane of glass. They also offer the option to open fully or slightly, depending on how far the handle is turned.

Pros and cons of tilt and turn windows

Some of the advantages of these windows include:

  • They are a brilliant option if you need a window for a smaller space as they take up very little room.
  • Like with casement windows, they are air-sealed when shut, meaning that insulation is efficient.
  • They have a smaller opening than other windows, making them great for kid’s rooms or anywhere where safety could be an issue.

Costing anywhere between £450-£600, they aren’t as cheap as other types of window but are still a relatively affordable option when compared to bay windows.

Window Materials

As well as styles, there are plenty of materials to choose from when considering your replacement windows. The material may seem insignificant but can completely transform the way your window looks. In the UK, uPVC is the most popular choice due to its low cost and ease of installation, but other options include:

  • Aluminium
  • Timber
  • Composite
  •  Steel

Window Glazing

Glazing offers another important choice for you to make when having new windows fitted. It can be tempting to pick the cheaper single glazing option, but this can leave your home struggling to retain heat, making your heating bills soar.

Double glazing can increase the warmth of your home, in turn reducing heating bills and also acting as a sound barrier to the outside world – you can go even further and opt for triple glazing for extra protection.

You can also pick to decorate your glazing through embossing, staining, and colour, so you have full flexibility when it comes to your new window.